Game cameras to track rare species at preserve

By Phil Major
publisher@wood.cm
Posted 10/7/21

With recent news that 23 species, including the ivory-billed woodpecker, have been declared extinct in the United States, the city of Mineola will be partnering on a project to keep an eye on other rare species in the area.

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Game cameras to track rare species at preserve

Posted

With recent news that 23 species, including the ivory-billed woodpecker, have been declared extinct in the United States, the city of Mineola will be partnering on a project to keep an eye on other rare species in the area.

The city council approved the agreement last Thursday with the East Texas Chapter of the Master Naturalists, working with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Dept., to track species through a series of 10 game cameras at the Mineola Nature Preserve.

One goal of the Texas Nature Trackers program is to aid in research and conservation efforts for native plants and animals that are rare or in decline.

In the 10-county area of the East Texas Chapter, sightings will be targeted for the swamp rabbit, muskrat, American black bear, Eastern black bear, long-tailed weasel, eastern spotted skunk and mountain lion.

Ten other species or groups are also planned to be tracked.

The public lands being targeted by the chapter also include the Tyler State Park in Smith County, and private lands in Wood, Van Zandt, Smith, Cherokee and Anderson Counties have also been identified.

Owen Tiner, city of Mineola marketing director, said images captured by the cameras will be made available to the city.

He said the goal is to locate cameras in areas of the nature preserve not usually visited by people.

The city’s parks and open spaces board also approved the request, which will be for a six-month period, starting Oct. 1.