Proposed redraw won’t split Wood

By Phil Major
publisher@wood.cm
Posted 10/7/21

Proposals for redistricting in Texas won’t impact Wood County for the state senate and state house of representatives but would shift the entire county into one U.S. congressional district.

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Proposed redraw won’t split Wood

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Proposals for redistricting in Texas won’t impact Wood County for the state senate and state house of representatives but would shift the entire county into one U.S. congressional district.

The proposals, being rolled out last week in Austin, would put the entire county in District 5, represented by U.S. Rep. Lance Gooden of Terrell.

The eastern part of the county has been represented by District 1 Congressman Louie Gohmert.

Both are Republicans.

Under the plan, Gooden’s district would include all of Wood County and the northwestern portion of Smith County. He would retain Kaufman, Van Zandt and Henderson Counties and lose Anderson and Cherokee Counties to District 6.

He would also continue to have a slice of eastern Dallas County, but it would shift slightly to run along the borders with Kaufman and Rockwall Counties and not dip as far west into north-central Dallas County.

In the state house, Wood County would remain in District 5 under the plan, along with Rains, Upshur, Camp, Titus and northern Smith County. The county has been represented by Cole Hefner of Titus County.

The county would also continue in the district represented by State Sen. Bryan Hughes of Mineola. District 1 includes 19 counties in the northeastern corner of the state under the plan. Rains would be in District 8 and Van Zandt would be in District 2

The proposals are being debated by the state legislature in Austin during its third special session. The congressional maps must account for two new districts based on Texas’ population increase since 2010.

Wood County and the city of Mineola will also be looking at commissioner and city council district lines in light of the 2020 US Census figures.

The new population totals must fall within tolerances or new lines must be drawn to meet one-person, one-vote guidelines.