Supt. Mize offers outlook on future of Mineola schools

Posted

New Mineola Superintendent Cody Mize spoke on his desire to serve and see growth at MISD during the Mineola Rotary Club meeting on Jan. 27. He wants to see great things happen for the students and believes that will happen when the community works together as one for the good of all.

Mize cited a verse from the book of Proverbs, “Many are the plans of a man’s heart, but the Lord directs his steps,” to explain the unexpected path of his 14-year career in education.

After graduating Texas A&M as a political science major, Mize began teaching and coaching in Quitman. This position led to teaching and coaching in Winona and later at Alba-Golden. 

He had the opportunity to spend a year as high school assistant principal in Grand Saline before returning to Alba-Golden as elementary  principal for two years.

A door opened at Quitman, and he served as high school principal for two more years. For the past four years, Mize has enjoyed a fulfilling position as superintendent of Winona ISD, but says it is a professional honor to be back home at MISD. 

Mize has definite views on his role of leadership in the community as school superintendent. He points out a statement given by General Robert E. Lee, a man considered by many to be a great leader of integrity and honor, after the Civil War when a mother asked what would be the greatest instruction she could give her infant son. 

Gen. Lee’s response was “Madam, teach him to deny himself.” Mize stands on that statement as the bedrock for leadership – deny self, our wants and desires, and serve the public.

“I work for seven elected officials at MISD, 230 employees and 1,643 students. These are my constituents. I work for the taxpayers of MISD,” asserts Mize.

He considers it his responsibility to bring the community together to give students the greatest opportunities they could possibly have.

Mize urges graduating students to have a plan. 

“Sitting in your momma’s basement is not an option,” laughs Mize. However, he recognizes that college is not an option for every student and encourages them to consider trade school, a career or the military. 

There is a job market shortage for skilled labor, and Mize wants to ensure that students can get technical training to later earn a living wage for themselves and their families. He likes the fundamental idea of a career and technical education (CTE) hub and can see significant CTE growth in the future. 

For growth to happen, Mize acknowledges the need for more teachers and more structural room at MISD. 

“We’re going to be in trouble if we don’t do something soon.” As of yet, with only a few days under his belt as MISD superintendent, he is not sure what the plan is but is diligently working toward finding the answers.

Mize is excited about what the future holds and the doors opened by the passing of House Bill 3 by the Texas legislature. With the injection of $11.6 billion into Texas public school systems, teachers can get much deserved pay raises. Funding and equity are being increased, property taxes are being reduced, and much work is being done in school safety. 

Mize is also looking forward to working with the public.

“We may not always agree, but you deserve the respect of having your voice heard,” Mize said.

Comments