County judge goes to Washington

Posted 5/26/22

Nineteen Texas county judges and commissioners recently completed a study in Washington, D.C. with the V.G. Young Institute of County Government, including Wood County Judge Lucy Hebron.

The group …

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County judge goes to Washington

Posted

Nineteen Texas county judges and commissioners recently completed a study in Washington, D.C. with the V.G. Young Institute of County Government, including Wood County Judge Lucy Hebron.

The group met with state government officials and congressional leaders to expand their knowledge of county issues at the federal level.

The officials participate in the Commissioners Court Leadership Academy, a two-year advanced leadership development program for commissioners court members in Texas.

Sponsored by the V.G. Young Institute of County Government, a part of Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, the program provides informative and educational seminars to improve the ability of its members to serve as advocates for county issues at all levels of government.

Hebron said, “The leadership sessions held in Washington this past week are a great example of how decisions made at the national level can affect us all on a local level.”

Leadership in public service, rural affairs initiatives, national security and U.S. foreign policy were among issues addressed.

Members took part in legislative briefings in the Capitol and visited with congressional representatives on Capitol Hill.

“The ability to talk with our legislators and staff in person gives us in county government the chance to speak for our counties and citizens and advocate for them on issues that affect us all.  There’s nothing more meaningful than having those face-to-face meetings,” Hebron said.

Members also visited the Hong Kong Mission to explore economic, trade and cultural ties with the U.S.

The National Association of Counties hosted the group and provided information on how local officials can also be effective advocates for their counties at the federal level.

The academy spent a day at the George Washington Institute in Arlington, Va. to gain a greater understanding of the enduring legacy of the first president and learn how to lead with character in times of change.

The academy is one of a number of ongoing educational programs offered by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service for Texas county officials.  

“The leadership academy has been one of the best experiences and training that a county official can have and results in having the necessary tools to adequately and zealously represent our counties,” Hebron said. “I’m grateful to Texas A&M and the V.G. Young Institute for sponsoring this amazing academy.”